Early ALUS participants in Manitoba, Charles and Meriel Tavernor

Cattle producers Charles and Meriel Tavernor were among the first ALUS participants in Manitoba.

On their 1,110-acre farm, just north of Basswood, along the south side of the Little Saskatchewan River Valley, they have converted much of the annual cropland to perennial forages, and now they carefully custom graze 300 head of cattle using a mob-grazing effort on small paddocks.

Their ALUS project is part of an ongoing series of improvements that has seen them restore and enhance wetlands, repair cuts and gullies, install offsite watering systems, plant shelterbelts and set up rotational grazing systems on their land.

The Tavernors are key advocates of the program, helping to spread the word about the value of the ALUS approach. They are well versed in the concept, having participated in similar schemes that pay for ecosystem services in their native England.

Ron Toonders, Switchgrass for Grassroots Resilience

Ron Toonders, Switchgrass for Grassroots Resilience

Farmers like Ron Toonders are building resilient practices that benefit nature and the agricultural landscape in Ontario   This photo depicts the root system of switchgrass, Panicum virgatum. (Grown at The Land Institute in Salina, Kansas) In the hot summer months,...

Currie McIntosh; Happily Creating Habitat at Haywood Farms

Currie McIntosh; Happily Creating Habitat at Haywood Farms

The McIntosh family is promoting biodiversity through their environmental projects on their farm in Ontario Currie McIntosh stands in front of the stormwater retention pond project he constructed with ALUS in 2020. In the fall of 2023, farmers and ranchers visited...