A Taste of ALUS at Queen’s Park

ALUS Canada and MPP Toby Barrett hosted a special reception at Queen’s Park on March 2019 in support of ALUS in Ontario.

Welcome to Queen's Park
Welcome to “A Taste of ALUS,” featuring Ontario-grown food and drink brought to you by ALUS farmers and ranchers, producing cleaner air, cleaner water and more wildlife habitat for Ontario’s communities.

A special reception at Queen’s Park on March 19, 2019, brought together approximately 25 Ontario MPPs from all parties, ALUS supporters, partners, participants and community leaders.

The “A Taste of ALUS” event included representatives of seven ALUS communities in Ontario and featured delicious, farm-fresh food and drink produced by ALUS farmers and ranchers.

It was an excellent opportunity for Ontario’s elected representatives to learn more about how ALUS can help communities across the province meet their environmental targets.

Acting as emcee, ALUS Canada’s CEO, Bryan Gilvesy, introduced ALUS Canada, A Weston Family Initiative, a national charitable organization whose program supports farmers and ranchers who produce cleaner air, cleaner water, more biodiversity and other ecosystem services in their communities.

“We believe in farmers as solution-providers for many of our environmental problems. The solutions lie in rural communities and in farmers and ranchers,” said Gilvesy.

Strong attendance at the ALUS reception reflected the popularity of a private member’s bill, in support of ALUS, introduced by Toby Barrett (the Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario MPP for Haldimand- Norfolk, Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry).

MPP Toby Barrett
The man of the hour, MPP Toby Barrett (centre), greets guests at a reception reflecting the popularity of Barrett’s Bill 28 in support of ALUS, which received unanimous support upon its second reading in the provincial legislature. “I proposed this legislation to raise awareness of the benefits of the ALUS approach, and was quite heartened that MPPs of all stripes supported the bill,” said Barrett.

Bill 28 has received unanimous support upon its second reading in the provincial legislature. [Read more here.]

“I proposed this legislation to raise awareness of the benefits of the ALUS approach,” said MPP Barrett, “and was quite heartened that MPPs of all stripes supported the bill.”

Fittingly, the speakers at this event also included Mike Schreiner (Leader of the Green Party of Ontario and MPP for Guelph), John Fraser (Interim Leader of the Ontario Liberal Party and MPP for Ottawa South), the Hon. John Yakabuski (Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry, and Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario MPP for Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke), and Paul Miller (Ontario New Democratic Party MPP for Hamilton East-Stoney Creek).

Green Party leader
The Leader of the Green Party of Ontario, Mike Schreiner (MPP for Guelph), has been a staunch ally of ALUS for many years, as has MPP Toby Barrett (on left) and many Ontario representatives from all parties.

“ALUS Canada is proud to be a community-developed, farmer-delivered program,” said Gilvesy. “Each ALUS community is strong and unique, determining its own priorities while benefitting from a shared set of ALUS principles and a central support system.”

There are now eight ALUS communities in southern Ontario, located between Cornwall, Windsor and Tobermory. Representatives of these ALUS communities helped host the “A Taste of ALUS” event and, as a special treat, provided a generous sampling of their own, Ontario farm-grown food and drink.

ALUS Canada was very pleased to welcome some key supporters to the event, including Jennifer Canham (Program Director, Conservation) from The W. Garfield Weston Foundation, ALUS Canada’s primary financial partner, as well as Carolyn Scotchmer (Executive Director, TD Friends of the Environment Foundation) and Helen McLean (Executive Director, Donner Foundation). The ALUS program is supported through a blend of philanthropic funding and government grants, with a new foray into corporate sponsorships through the New Acre™ Project.

ALUS supporters
The ALUS program is supported through a blend of philanthropic funding, government grants and corporate sponsorships. ALUS is grateful for strong support in Ontario and across Canada. From L to R: Bryan Gilvesy (CEO, ALUS Canada), Jennifer Canham (Program Director, Conservation, The W. Garfield Weston Foundation), Carolyn Scotchmer (Executive Director, TD Friends of the Environment Foundation), Alyssa Cousineau (Program Coordinator, ALUS Elgin)

Many of ALUS’ important strategic partners were also in attendance, including Don Ciparis (Board Member for Ontario, National Farmers Union), Jo-Anne Rzadki (Business Development and Partnerships, Conservation Ontario), Judy Maxwell (General Manager, Long Point Region Conservation Authority), Dr. Andrew MacDougall and his students (MacDougall Ecology Lab, Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph), Emma Horrigan (Conservation Science Coordinator, Ontario Nature), and Mike Collins-Williams (Director of Policy, Ontario Home Builders Association).

The Queen’s Park event brought together many diverse stakeholders, highlighting that the beauty of ALUS lies in its strong partnerships. At its root, the ALUS program supports synergies between farmers, communities and the environment, with many benefits for all stakeholders.

ALUS team in Ontario
ALUS in Ontario was well represented at Queens Park. From L to R: Doug McGee (ALUS Lambton PAC Chair), Lynn Bishop (ALUS Canada), Bryan Gilvesy (ALUS Canada), Katherine Balpataky (ALUS Canada), Simon DeBoer (ALUS Grey Bruce PAC Chair), Joe Csoff (ALUS Norfolk PAC Chair), Lara Ellis (ALUS Canada), Casey Whitelock (ALUS Canada), Henry Bakker (ALUS Peterborough coordinator), Michelle Primus (ALUS Canada), Jake Lozon (ALUS Lambton staff), Cory VanGronigan (ALUS Norfolk participant). Also in attendance were representatives of ALUS Elgin, ALUS Middlesex and ALUS Chatham-Kent (not in this photo).

It’s a formula that is working. Nearly 400 Ontario farmers have already chosen to become ALUS participants, and to transform more than 3,100 acres of marginal land into wetland, grassland and woodland projects.

All these ALUS projects produce important ecosystem services that directly benefit rural communities across the province. For instance, ALUS projects in Ontario not only sequester carbon in the soil to produce cleaner air, but also reduce phosphorus to produce cleaner water in our lakes and rivers, and increase wildlife habitat and biodiversity in our communities.

“ALUS’ environmental impact is growing quickly, and with widespread support, it will continue to grow,” said Gilvesy. “In Ontario, and all across this nation, ALUS farmers and ranchers are part of the solution for improving the environment for Canadians.”

Click here to view more photos (photo album on our Facebook page).

Read more about ALUS in Ontario in this downloadable PDF: Backgrounder-ALUS in Ontario-March 2019

Ontario backgrounder
Putting ALUS on the map in Ontario: There are currently eight ALUS communities in Ontario, located between Cornwall, Windsor and Tobermory.

 


VIDEO: Fully Implementing Wetland Policy in Alberta

Speaking at the Edmonton Convention Centre on March 20, 2019, ALUS Canada’s CEO, Bryan Gilvesy, presented creative solutions to wetland restoration at the Rural Municipalities of Alberta’s Spring Convention.

ALUS Canada’s CEO, Bryan Gilvesy, presented the case for creative solutions to wetland restoration at the Rural Municipalities of Alberta’s Spring Convention, held March 20, 2019, at the Edmonton Convention Centre.

Accompanied by Parkland County’s mayor, Rod Shaigec, Gilvesy explained how ALUS helps communities invest in natural infrastructure on the landscape.

In all 25 ALUS communities across six provinces—including 13 local programs in Alberta alone—ALUS projects aim to enhance the function of wetlands and riparian areas on local farms and ranches.

And by keeping these projects in good working order each year, ALUS participants produce ecosystem services such as flood resilience, cleaner water, cleaner air and more biodiversity.

This is an important return on investment that benefits every community.

Watch full video (10 mins): https://youtu.be/N2arDl-lLO4

 


Chatham-Kent launches the 23rd ALUS community in Canada

The community came out in force to celebrate the launch of a new ALUS program in southern Ontario

The community came out in force on February 28, 2019, to celebrate the launch of the new ALUS Chatham-Kent program in southern Ontario. Photo: Chanel Barry
The community came out in force on February 28, 2019, to celebrate the launch of the new ALUS Chatham-Kent program in southern Ontario. Photo: Chanel Barry

The Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority (LTVCA) held a jam-packed breakfast event at Country View Golf Club in Dover Centre on February 28, 2019, to officially launch the new ALUS Chatham-Kent program.

“It’s good to see so many really interested and engaged landowners,” said Mike Buis, co-chair of the ALUS Chatham-Kent Partnership Advisory Committee (PAC), who spoke at the press conference and led a lively question-and-answer session.

As a partnership between ALUS Canada, A Weston Family Initiative, and the LTVCA, ALUS Chatham-Kent is the 23rd ALUS community in Canada.

ALUS Canada and the Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority have partnered up to launch ALUS Chatham-Kent, the 23rd ALUS community in Canada. Shown here, from left to right: Amanda Blain (Program Coordinator, ALUS Chatham-Kent), Mike Buis (PAC Chair, ALUS Chatham-Kent), Casey Whitelock (Eastern Hub Manager, ALUS Canada), Mark Peacock (General Manager, LTVCA). Photo: Chanel Barry
ALUS Canada and the Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority have partnered up to launch ALUS Chatham-Kent, the 23rd ALUS community in Canada. Shown here, from left to right: Amanda Blain (Program Coordinator, ALUS Chatham-Kent), Mike Buis (PAC Chair, ALUS Chatham-Kent), Casey Whitelock (Eastern Hub Manager, ALUS Canada), Mark Peacock (CAO/Secretary-Treasurer, LTVCA). Photo: Chanel Barry

“My team and I are looking forward to a lot of great things to come from everyone at ALUS Chatham-Kent,” said ALUS Canada’s Eastern Hub Manager, Casey Whitelock.

All ALUS projects are intended to produce cleaner water, cleaner air and more biodiversity, including pollinator habitat, for the benefit of everyone in the community.

“I am excited to have ALUS in the region, because it will help balance the economics of farming with the economics of conservation,” said Chatham-Kent’s Mayor, Darrin Canniff.

“I am excited to have ALUS in the region, because it will help balance the economics of farming with the economics of conservation,” said Chatham-Kent Mayor Darrin Canniff at the ALUS Chatham-Kent launch in February 2019. Photo: Chanel Barry
“I am excited to have ALUS in the region, because it will help balance the economics of farming with the economics of conservation,” said Chatham-Kent Mayor Darrin Canniff at the ALUS Chatham-Kent launch in February 2019. Photo: Chanel Barry

Active in six provinces across the nation, the ALUS program helps landowners develop and support environmental projects on their farms that are best suited to local needs and priorities.

“We will work with farmers and ranchers to help establish projects that address important local environmental issues, such as deforestation, habitat loss and nutrient loading in Lake Erie,” said ALUS Chatham-Kent Program Coordinator Amanda Blain, who handed out more that 20 expression-of-interest forms to potential ALUS participants during the popular event.

ALUS Chatham-Kent PAC member Colin Little presented on harmful algal blooms and best management practices that can help reduce phosphorus loading from agricultural sources.

This important work is part of ALUS’ commitment to the Great Lakes Protection Initiative from Environment and Climate Change Canada, who is helping ALUS Canada fund ALUS Chatham-Kent and several other ALUS communities in the Lake Erie region: see announcement here.

ALUS Chatham-Kent PAC member Colin Little welcomed guests to the February 2019 launch event and made a presentation on harmful algal blooms and ways to reduce phosphorus-loading from agricultural sources, as part of ALUS’ commitment to the Great Lakes Protection Initiative from Environment and Climate Change Canada. Photo: Chanel Barry
ALUS Chatham-Kent PAC member Colin Little welcomed guests to the February 2019 launch event and made a presentation on harmful algal blooms and ways to reduce phosphorus-loading from agricultural sources, as part of ALUS’ commitment to the Great Lakes Protection Initiative from Environment and Climate Change Canada. Photo: Chanel Barry

ALUS Chatham-Kent participants will receive annual, per-acre payments for the management and maintenance of ALUS projects on select parcels of marginal or uneconomic land on their farms—these ALUS projects will typically involve re-establishing and enhancing grasslands, woodlands and wetlands.

“We believe this partnership will be beneficial to farmers and to the future of our watershed,” said Mark Peacock, LTVCA’s CAO and Secretary-Treasurer.

ALUS Canada is proud to support this new ALUS community with funding from an Ontario Trillium Foundation Grow Grant in partnership with Ontario Nature, as well as from Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Great Lakes Protection Initiative, and from other generous supporters.

For more information on ALUS Chatham-Kent, visit their web page here.

Presenting the original Partnership Advisory Committee (PAC) for ALUS Chatham-Kent. From left to right, front row: Colin Little, Greg Van Every, Jordan Sinclair, Sandra Carther, Amanda Blain, Allen Jackson, Mike Wilson. Back row: Mike Buis, Ralph Brodie, Chris White, Colin Elgie, Josh Deschryver. Not Pictured: Johnathan Brinkman, Steven Taekema. Photo: Chanel Barry
Presenting the original Partnership Advisory Committee (PAC) for ALUS Chatham-Kent. From left to right, front row: Colin Little, Greg Van Every, Jordan Sinclair, Sandra Carther, Amanda Blain, Allen Jackson, Mike Wilson. Back row: Mike Buis, Ralph Brodie, Chris White, Colin Elgie, Josh Deschryver. Not Pictured: Johnathan Brinkman, Steven Taekema. Photo: Chanel Barry

ABOUT THE LTVCA

One of the 36 Conservation Authorities in Ontario, the Lower Thames Valley Conservation Authority (LTVCA) works with the local community to provide services and information to efficiently protect and enhance the environment. The LTVCA has jurisdiction over the watersheds of all streams draining into the Thames River and into Lake Erie, an area covering nearly 3,300 km2 that is home to 107,000 people and 10 member municipalities.


Celebrating ALUS Peterborough

ALUS Canada and the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters officially launched the ALUS Peterborough program in October 2018.

The ALUS Peterborough community launched officially in October, 2018. From left to right: Daryl Bennett (Peterborough’s then-Mayor), Angelo Lombardo (Executive Director, OFAH), Casey Whitelock (East Hub Manager, ALUS Canada), Bryan Gilvesy (CEO, ALUS Canada), Henry Bakker (Program Coordinator, ALUS Peterborough)
The ALUS Peterborough community launched officially in October, 2018. From left to right: Daryl Bennett (Peterborough’s then-Mayor), Angelo Lombardo (Executive Director, OFAH), Casey Whitelock (East Hub Manager, ALUS Canada), Bryan Gilvesy (CEO, ALUS Canada), Henry Bakker (Program Coordinator, ALUS Peterborough)

ALUS Canada and the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters (OFAH) officially launched the ALUS Peterborough program in the fall, with a special reception followed by a field tour of this ALUS community’s first projects.

OFAH’s Executive Director, Angelo Lombardo, welcomed all guests to the Mario Cortellucci Hunting and Fishing Heritage Centre in Peterborough, Ontario, to kick off the October 13 launch with a press conference featuring presentations by ALUS Canada’s CEO, Bryan Gilvesy, and ALUS Peterborough’s Program Coordinator, Henry Bakker.

“We look forward to working closely with our partners at the OFAH, and with ALUS Peterborough’s Partnership Advisory Committee, for many years to come,” said Gilvesy. “Together, we will support Peterborough’s farmers in producing cleaner air, cleaner water and more biodiversity for this part of Ontario.”

OFAH’s Executive Director, Angelo Lombardo, welcomed all guests to the Mario Cortellucci Hunting and Fishing Heritage Centre in Peterborough, Ontario, to kick off the ALUS Peterborough launch with a press conference on October 13.
OFAH’s Executive Director, Angelo Lombardo, welcomed all guests to the Mario Cortellucci Hunting and Fishing Heritage Centre in Peterborough, Ontario, to kick off the ALUS Peterborough launch with a press conference on October 13.

Gilvesy commended OFAH, and particularly Bakker, for doing a great job getting the program up and running. ALUS Peterborough began as a pilot program in 2016 and, by the time it became official in 2018, local farmers had already enrolled more than 60 acres into the program.

All ALUS communities aim to address local environmental concerns; for ALUS Peterborough, these concerns centre around the loss of wildlife habitat in this part of Ontario. To that end, they will plant native trees and shrubs, establish oak savannah agroforestry projects, restore fencerows, riparian zones and native tallgrass prairie, and adopt a delayed-haying program.

Why is ALUS a good fit for this region? For one thing, as Bakker explained: “We have a lot of young people committing their lives to farming in Peterborough and the Kawartha Lakes, and they’re looking for creative and innovative ways to do that.”

Going forward, Bakker and his team will work with farmers to identify stewardship opportunities on their land, typically by taking some marginal, uneconomic, environmentally sensitive land out of agricultural production and putting it to the production of ecosystem services instead.

The ALUS Peterborough team will also support farmers through the project approval and implementation process, and provide annual, per-acre payments to help them maintain and manage the ALUS projects on their land over time.

Doug Kennedy (ALUS Peterborough PAC Chair, on left), Henry Bakker (ALUS Peterborough Program Coordinator, centre) and Bryan Gilvesy (ALUS Canada CEO, on right) celebrate the partnership between ALUS Canada and the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters at the official launch of the ALUS Peterborough program.
Doug Kennedy (ALUS Peterborough PAC Chair, on left), Henry Bakker (ALUS Peterborough Program Coordinator, centre) and Bryan Gilvesy (ALUS Canada CEO, on right) celebrate the partnership between ALUS Canada and the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters at the official launch of the ALUS Peterborough program.

After a delicious lunch, guests then set out to see some ALUS Peterborough projects on the ground with a guided tour of two ALUS project sites.

For the first stop on the tour, guests visited ALUS Peterborough PAC member Michelle Macdonald’s farm, near Omemee. Her first ALUS project involved planting native trees to establish 10.5 acres of oak savannah, a rare Ontario habitat combining grasslands and fire-resistant oaks.

In the future, Macdonald intends this ALUS project to support agroforestry, or silvopasture, practices, a mutually beneficial way of integrating trees, forage and grazing for their free-range chickens and pigs, to produce both food and ecosystem services for the community.

For the first stop on the tour, guests visited ALUS Peterborough PAC member Michelle Macdonald’s farm, near Omemee. Her first ALUS project involved planting native trees to establish 10.5 acres of oak savannah, a rare Ontario habitat combining grasslands and fire-resistant oaks. Shown here with members of the original ALUS Peterborough PAC, from left to right: Holly Shipclark (Kawartha Conservation), Casey Whitelock (ALUS Canada), Henry Bakker (ALUS Peterborough/OFAH), Michelle Macdonald (and family), Doug Kennedy (PAC Chair), Jeff Wiltshire (MNRF).
For the first stop on the tour, guests visited ALUS Peterborough PAC member Michelle Macdonald’s farm, near Omemee. Her first ALUS project involved planting native trees to establish 10.5 acres of oak savannah, a rare Ontario habitat combining grasslands and fire-resistant oaks. Shown here with members of the original ALUS Peterborough PAC, from left to right: Holly Shipclark (Kawartha Conservation), Casey Whitelock (ALUS Canada), Henry Bakker (ALUS Peterborough/OFAH), Michelle Macdonald (and family), Doug Kennedy (PAC Chair), Jeff Wiltshire (MNRF).

At the second stop on the tour, guests visited Jim and Catherine Hughes’ farm, near Lindsay, to learn about a fencing project established during ALUS Peterborough’s pilot project phase. ALUS helped the Hughes family erect a fence around 18 acres of wetland and riparian habitat, to keep the farm’s cattle out of this sensitive area.

They also installed a watering system in the pasture, to provide an alternate source of fresh water for the livestock, and enhanced the habitat value of this area by planting a mix of native trees and shrubs.

With some maintenance and management each year, this ALUS project will continue to produce a whole suite of valuable ecosystem services, such as cleaner water for a large wetland complex located downstream from the property, and improved wildlife habitat for aquatic and other species on the farm.

At the second stop on the tour, guests visited an ALUS Peterborough project on Jim and Catherine Hughes’ farm, near Lindsay. This project includes strong fencing to keep cattle out of 18 acres of wetlands and riparian zones, an alternate source of fresh water installed in the pasture, and habitat enhancement with native trees and shrubs. With some maintenance and management each year, this project will continue to produce a whole suite of valuable ecosystem services, such as cleaner water and improved wildlife habitat.
At the second stop on the tour, guests visited an ALUS Peterborough project on Jim and Catherine Hughes’ farm, near Lindsay. This project includes strong fencing to keep cattle out of 18 acres of wetlands and riparian zones, an alternate source of fresh water installed in the pasture, and habitat enhancement with native trees and shrubs. With some maintenance and management each year, this project will continue to produce a whole suite of valuable ecosystem services, such as cleaner water and improved wildlife habitat.

By the end of the day, guests had seen how the ALUS program works on the ground, and how strongly it can benefit their community in Peterborough and Kawartha Lakes.

ALUS Canada is proud to support this new ALUS community with funding from an Ontario Trillium Foundation Grow Grant, in partnership with Ontario Nature, as well as from the Species at Risk Stewardship Fund from the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, from The W. Garfield Weston Foundation and our other Foundational Partners, and from all our generous donors.

Please visit the ALUS Peterborough web page for more information.

With a successful press conference and the first-ever ALUS Peterborough field tour, the Peterborough and Kawartha Lakes community had a full day to experience what the ALUS program is all about, and to see how strongly it can benefit their community. From left to right: Pete Peeters, Pat Buxton, Holly Shipclark (front), Joe Banbury (behind), Casey Whitelock, Sarah Wilhelm (behind), David Schelhas, Andrew Macdonald (behind), Henry Bakker, Michelle Macdonald, Doug Kennedy, Jeff Wiltshire, Mike Evers, Stephen Huntley, Chris Robinson.
With a successful press conference and the first-ever ALUS Peterborough field tour, the Peterborough and Kawartha Lakes community had a full day to experience what the ALUS program is all about, and to see how strongly it can benefit their community. From left to right: Pete Peeters, Pat Buxton, Holly Shipclark (front), Joe Banbury (behind), Casey Whitelock, Sarah Wilhelm (behind), David Schelhas, Andrew Macdonald (behind), Henry Bakker, Michelle Macdonald, Doug Kennedy, Jeff Wiltshire, Mike Evers, Stephen Huntley, Chris Robinson.

Putting Modeste to the Test

Work is on track for the Modeste Natural Infrastructure Project, whose first annual meeting was held in Edmonton February 5, 2019.

On February 5, 2019, ALUS Canada attended the first annual partner meeting for the Modeste Natural Infrastructure Project, an important Alberta-based initiative we announced in May of 2018.

The Modeste Natural Infrastructure Project will evaluate the financial benefits of conserving and enhancing natural infrastructure on agricultural lands in the Modeste Creek watershed in Alberta.

It will also help restore and enhance 650 acres of wetland and riparian areas in Wetaskiwin, Leduc, Parkland and Brazeau Counties, through the ALUS program. For detailed information on the Modeste Natural Infrastructure Project, click here.

The first annual meeting, which was held at the Alberta Innovates offices in Edmonton, brought together all project partners—ALUS Canada, University of Guelph, Innotech Alberta, North Saskatchewan Watershed Alliance (NSWA) and Parkland County.

Work is on track, both in terms of the research component and the on-the-ground restoration and enhancement work being overseen by Christine Campbell, ALUS Canada’s western hub manager.

At the first annual partner meeting for the Modeste Natural Infrastructure Project, held in Edmonton in February 2019, Lara Ellis (Vice-President, Policy and Partnerships at ALUS Canada) outlined how this Project is one component of a strategy to increase support for natural solutions on agricultural lands in Canada.
At the first annual partner meeting for the Modeste Natural Infrastructure Project, held in Edmonton in February 2019, Lara Ellis (Vice-President, Policy and Partnerships at ALUS Canada) outlined how this Project is one component of a strategy to increase support for natural solutions on agricultural lands in Canada.

Following the meeting, Innotech Alberta and NSWA organized a half-day workshop to showcase the Modeste project research as well as other research taking place in the North Saskatchewan watershed.

Mary Ellen Shain of the NSWA gave opening remarks that included the important role of municipalities in setting watershed goals and meeting water-related objectives.

ALUS Canada’s Lara Ellis spoke about opportunities to save tax dollars and achieve many environmental and social benefits by investing in natural infrastructure to mitigate flood and drought and to improve water quality.

The workshop featured a series of “lightning talks” from the Government of Alberta, EPCOR, the University of Alberta, and two project partners, the University of Guelph and Innotech Alberta.

During the workshop portion of the event, Diana Staley (Economic Researcher, Innotech Alberta) explained how experts from the University of Guelph and InnoTech Alberta will use scientific modelling as part of the Modeste Natural Infrastructure Project, to evaluate how natural infrastructure can help improve water quality and reduce flood impacts.
During the workshop portion of the event, Diana Staley (Economic Researcher, Innotech Alberta) explained how experts from the University of Guelph and InnoTech Alberta will use scientific modelling as part of the Modeste Natural Infrastructure Project, to evaluate how natural infrastructure can help improve water quality and reduce flood impacts.

These very short presentations touched engagingly on new efforts in water-quality monitoring, watershed integrity, the impacts of climate change on water supply, risks to drinking-water infrastructure, the evaluation of ecosystem services resulting from restoration work, and the costs and benefits of natural infrastructure.

The workshop concluded with a discussion of future policy priorities and research needs, and insights on how to collaborate to ensure the best use of research and resources.

ALUS Canada left the meeting with renewed enthusiasm for the Modeste Natural Infrastructure Project, knowing that it will have a significant impact in developing a better understanding of the importance of natural infrastructure for all Canadians.

An information sheet about the Modeste project is available here:

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ALUS participants win 2018 OTIS awards

Battle River Watershed Alliance recognizes outstanding stewardship work of Alana and Justin Schamber (ALUS Wetaskiwin-Leduc), and Marie and Don Ruzicka (ALUS Flagstaff)

Thanks to the Battle River Watershed Alliance for recognizing several ALUS participants in Alberta for their outstanding environmental stewardship work. The 2018 OTIS Awards have been presented to Alana and Justin Schamber (ALUS Wetaskiwin-Leduc) and Marie and Don Ruzicka (ALUS Flagstaff)
Thanks to the Battle River Watershed Alliance for recognizing several ALUS participants in Alberta for their outstanding environmental stewardship work. The 2018 OTIS Awards have been presented to Alana and Justin Schamber (ALUS Wetaskiwin-Leduc) and Marie and Don Ruzicka (ALUS Flagstaff).

Congratulations to ALUS participants Alana and Justin Schamber (ALUS Wetaskiwin-Leduc) and Marie and Don Ruzicka (ALUS Flagstaff) for earning 2018 OTIS Awards in recognition of their outstanding environmental stewardship.

The OTIS Awards are presented annually by the Battle River Watershed Alliance to businesses, organizations, individuals and youth in Alberta’s Battle River and Sounding Creek watersheds for taking action though on-the-ground efforts, education, and the responsible overseeing and protection of the watershed’s environment as “something worth preserving.”

This year’s Farm Award went to Tin Forest Farm, where ALUS Wetaskiwin-Leduc participants Alana and Justin Schamber are excellent wetland caretakers who also work to raise awareness about local food and connect people to the land through farm tours and kids camps.

According to the Battle River Watershed Alliance, “the Schamber family see themselves as caretakers of the planet, ensuring that what happens on their farm is good for the environment, the animals, and the people.”

They have worked with ALUS to establish fences around the wetlands to exclude their livestock, thus preserving the ecological integrity of the surface water and creek that run through this area—indeed, wetlands cover approximately a third of their farm.

Congratulations to ALUS Wetaskiwin-Leduc participants Alana and Justin Schamber of Tin Forest Farm, who have been awarded a 2018 OTIS Award by the Battle River Watershed Alliance for their excellence as wetland caretakers who also work to raise awareness through farm tours and kids camps.
Congratulations to ALUS Wetaskiwin-Leduc participants Alana and Justin Schamber of Tin Forest Farm, who have been awarded a 2018 OTIS Award by the Battle River Watershed Alliance for their excellence as wetland caretakers who also work to raise awareness through farm tours and kids camps.

“Participating in the ALUS program is just one example of Alana and Justin’s many stewardship activities,” says Kim Barkwell, ALUS Wetaskiwin-Leduc’s Program Coordinator. “When it comes to community, the Schamber family heeds the call fearlessly.”

Click for more information on the ALUS Wetaskiwin-Leduc program.

This year’s Individual Award was presented to ALUS Flagstaff participants Marie and Don Ruzicka for “Leading By Example” on Sunrise Farm, northwest of Killam, Alberta.

The Ruzickas farmed their 800 acres conventionally until 1995, when a course in holistic management changed how they viewed the land: They now manage their land organically and holistically to produce healthy plant communities.

As ALUS participants, they have restored native grasslands, enhanced wetlands, and planted buffer areas around them for wildlife habitat, which has triggered a resurgence of biodiversity on their farm.

They also helped form the Iron Creek Watershed Improvement Society and have worked on many educational initiatives to connect youth to the land and to farming. For all these reasons, the Battle River Watershed Alliance concluded that “the Ruzickas have made a tangible difference on the land they care for, and in the many people they inspire.”

Click for more information on the ALUS Flagstaff program.

“We want to thank the Battle River Watershed Alliance for recognizing some of our ALUS participants as the outstanding stewards of the land that they are,” said Christine Campbell, ALUS Canada’s Western Hub Manager.

Congratulations to ALUS Flagstaff participants Marie and Don Ruzicka for earning a 2018 OTIS Award for “Leading By Example” on Sunrise Farm. They have restored native grasslands, enhanced wetlands, and planted buffer areas to trigger a resurgence of biodiversity on their land, and have worked on many educational initiatives to connect youth to the land and to farming.
Congratulations to ALUS Flagstaff participants Marie and Don Ruzicka for earning a 2018 OTIS Award for “Leading By Example” on Sunrise Farm. They have restored native grasslands, enhanced wetlands, and planted buffer areas to trigger a resurgence of biodiversity on their land, and have worked on many educational initiatives to connect youth to the land and to farming.

The Battle River Watershed Alliance (BRWA) is the designated Watershed Planning and Advisory Council for the Battle River and Sounding Creek Watersheds in Alberta. Founded in 2006, it is a non-governmental organization dedicated to preserving and enhancing the land and water in these basins by taking a balanced approach for healthy natural areas, resilient communities, and a stable economy.

For more information on the OTIS awards: http://www.battleriverwatershed.ca/stewardship/otis-awards/

The Battle River Watershed Alliance (BRWA) is the designated Watershed Planning and Advisory Council for the Battle River and Sounding Creek Watersheds in Alberta.
The Battle River Watershed Alliance (BRWA) is the designated Watershed Planning and Advisory Council for the Battle River and Sounding Creek Watersheds in Alberta.

Care Runs in the Family

Meet dedicated ALUS Red Deer County participants Kevin and Roxanne Ziola

The whole Ziola family helps maintain the many ALUS projects on Iron Kreek Ranch, in Red Deer County, Alberta. Here, Roxanne (on right) and Josi (on left) clean out and “re-stuff” some Mallard hen nesting structures.
The whole Ziola family helps maintain the many ALUS projects on Iron Kreek Ranch, in Red Deer County, Alberta. Here, Roxanne (on right) and Josi (on left) clean out and “re-stuff” some Mallard hen nesting structures.

Located near snowy Sylvan Lake, Alberta, ALUS Red Deer County participants Kevin and Roxanne Ziola run Iron Kreek Ranch, a 1,600-acre (10 quarter-section) cow/calf and lamb operation that incorporates 21 different ALUS projects.

“We enjoy nature, and we believe it’s important to be able to work with nature while at the same time making a living in agriculture,” says Kevin. “ALUS makes it easier for us to incorporate conservation projects in our farm.”

ALUS participants since 2014, the Ziolas’ commitment to the program continues to increase each year. Kevin joined the ALUS Red Deer County PAC (Partnership Advisory Committee) in 2016, and started serving as a Farmer Liaison for the ALUS Red Deer County program in 2019.

They have so far enrolled 28 acres of their land into the program for 21 ALUS projects, including year-round alternative livestock waterers and about four kilometres of riparian fencing.

Ranchers Kevin and Roxanne Ziola’s first major ALUS project was wildlife-friendly fencing to prevent their cattle from getting into the Tindastoll Creek that through their land in Red Deer County, Alberta.
Ranchers Kevin and Roxanne Ziola’s first major ALUS project was wildlife-friendly fencing to prevent their cattle from getting into the Tindastoll Creek that through their land in Red Deer County, Alberta.

Their first major ALUS project was to prevent their cattle from getting into the Tindastoll Creek, which runs through most of their land. ALUS helped them fence off the creek to protect the banks, improve riparian habitat and preserve water quality for communities downstream.

“We ran a hot wire along both sides of the creek. It keeps the cattle out but still lets the wildlife in. It works really well,” says Kevin.

They enhanced the riparian zone on both sides of the creek by planting trees and shrubs and establishing wildlife habitat structures, such as Mallard hen nesting tunnels (see photo above).

Barred from accessing the creek, the livestock need an alternative source of drinking water. ALUS helped the Ziolas install an off-site watering system: Every spring, the creek fills a dugout pond for a year-round supply of fresh water at three drinking stations located in the pastures (see photo).

ALUS Red Deer County helped participant Kevin Ziola establish this off-site watering system to supply Iron Kreek Ranch’s cattle with fresh drinking water year-round. “It works really well,” he says. Coupled with wildlife-friendly fending to keep the cows out of the nearby creek, this ALUS project helps protect the banks, the riparian habitat zone and water quality for communities downstream.
ALUS Red Deer County helped participant Kevin Ziola establish this off-site watering system to supply Iron Kreek Ranch’s cattle with fresh drinking water year-round. “It works really well,” he says. Coupled with wildlife-friendly fending to keep the cows out of the nearby creek, this ALUS project helps protect the banks, the riparian habitat zone and water quality for communities downstream.

All the Ziolas’ ALUS projects are helping the environment by improving riparian areas and buffer zones, providing habitat for waterfowl, creating wildlife corridors, producing cleaner water, greater biodiversity and other ecosystem services for the wider community.

The land has been in the Ziola family since 1947, when Kevin’s grandparents arrived from Saskatchewan. Kevin and Roxanne’s children now represent the fourth generation on the family farm. The eldest, Josi, already helps her parents manage some of the ALUS projects on their land, as part of a family that actively pursues success on both agricultural and environmental fronts.

Not surprisingly, the Ziolas were nominated for an Alberta Beef Environmental Stewardship Award in 2017.

Established in 2013, the ALUS Red Deer County Program is the third-oldest ALUS program in Alberta. Program coordinator Ken Lewis and his team have already enrolled more than 4,500 acres into the program.  For more information, please visit: https://alus.ca/alus_community/alus-red-deer-county/

In September 2017, ALUS Red Deer County participants Kevin and Roxanne Ziola hosted a tour of their ALUS projects on Iron Kreek Ranch near Sylvan Lake, Alberta. Kevin is also a PAC member and Farmer Liaison.
In September 2017, ALUS Red Deer County participants Kevin and Roxanne Ziola hosted a tour of their ALUS projects on Iron Kreek Ranch near Sylvan Lake, Alberta. Kevin is also a PAC member and Farmer Liaison.

Flexible and Strong in Saskatchewan

ALUS WUQWATR participants Larry and DeLee Grant produce wildlife habitat and other ecosystem services in Saskatchewan.

Husband-and-wife team DeLee and Larry Grant, whose property is located near White City, Saskatchewan, are a perfect example of community members who actively engage with the ALUS program at many levels.
Husband-and-wife team DeLee and Larry Grant, whose property is located near White City, Saskatchewan, are a perfect example of community members who actively engage with the ALUS program at many levels.

It’s no secret that one of the strongest assets of the ALUS program is its flexibility—and this is certainly the case in ALUS WUQWATR, Saskatchewan.

ALUS is known across Canada as a community-developed program that addresses local environmental priorities, respects agricultural knowhow and relies on the input and involvement of local community members.

Husband-and-wife team Larry and DeLee Grant, whose property is located near White City, Saskatchewan, are a perfect example of community members who actively engage with the ALUS program at many levels. Larry joined Saskatchewan’s first-ever Partnership Advisory Committee (PAC) in 2011. Since then, he has taken on the role of Chair of the ALUS WUQWATR PAC, while he and DeLee have also signed up as participants.

The Grants’ main ALUS project is a five-acre reforestation site, featuring diverse tree species commonly found in Saskatchewan, such as prickly rose, spruce, poplar, pin cherry and lilac. The project was initiated by the Grants, with the support of neighbours who kindly pitched in for a long spring day of tree-planting in the late spring of 2013.

The Grants’ ALUS project is now an excellent source of food, shelter and habitat for a wide range of wildlife and pollinators, such as this Painted Lady butterfly resting on a fragrant lilac. (Photo: DeLee Grant)
The Grants’ ALUS project is now an excellent source of food, shelter and habitat for a wide range of wildlife and pollinators, such as this Painted Lady butterfly resting on a fragrant lilac. (Photo: DeLee Grant)

The ALUS WUQWATR community, which is a partnership between ALUS Canada and the source-water protection agency known as the Wascana and Upper Qu’Appelle Watersheds Association Taking Responsibility (WUQWATR), helped advise and guide the project, shared the cost of planting the tree seedlings, and now provides an annual payment for Larry and DeLee’s continued management and maintenance of their ALUS project.

The Grants’ ALUS project, which was expanded in 2014, is now an excellent source of food, shelter and habitat for a wide range of wildlife and pollinators, which benefits the local environment and the community at large. “We see lots of deer, even moose tracks,” says Larry. “We’ve also noticed an increase in the butterfly and bird population—we see so many nests once the leaves have fallen.”

Before and After: Larry and DeLee Grant’s ALUS project was established in 2013 (left); Five years later, the trees are flourishing thanks to their excellent management and maintenance (right). (Photos: DeLee Grant)
Before and After: Larry and DeLee Grant’s ALUS project was established in 2013 (left); Five years later, the trees are flourishing thanks to their excellent management and maintenance (right). (Photos: DeLee Grant)

Habitat is just one of the ecosystem services produced by this ALUS project: The trees also sequester carbon, improve the health of the soil and retain water on the landscape, which is an important boon for the community at large.

This ALUS project has also provided a wealth of personal enjoyment for the Grants. It provides scenic inspiration for DeLee, a talented Saskatchewan painter and photographer. (To see more of her work, visit this website.)

“We really appreciate our shelterbelt. It’s about a mile and half long, and we walk around it every day. We look forward to enjoying it for many years to come, knowing that it serves a purpose for the environment, and for the community as well,” says Larry.

In this way, the Grants’ ALUS project not only helps to keep the participants themselves flexible and strong, it also showcases the flexibility and strength of the community-based ALUS program that they continue to support, and to help lead.

In addition to producing vital ecosystem services for the community, the Grants’ ALUS project also provides great personal enjoyment, including physical exercise for the couple and scenic inspiration for DeLee, a talented painter and photographer whose beautiful lilac painting is shown here. (Photo: DeLee Grant)
In addition to producing vital ecosystem services for the community, the Grants’ ALUS project also provides great personal enjoyment, including physical exercise for the couple and scenic inspiration for DeLee, a talented painter and photographer whose beautiful lilac painting is shown here. (Photo: DeLee Grant)

The Nature of Meadowlea

ALUS Lambton participants Scott & Susan Stephens produce 25 acres of ecosystem services in Brigden, Ontario.

ALUS Lambton participants Scott and Susan Stephens maintain eight ALUS projects on environmentally sensitive parcels of land on Meadowlea Farms, including this Ontario native tallgrass prairie project producing excellent habitat for pollinators and wildlife.
ALUS Lambton participants Scott and Susan Stephens maintain eight ALUS projects on environmentally sensitive parcels of land on Meadowlea Farms, including this Ontario native tallgrass prairie project producing excellent habitat for pollinators and wildlife.

There are a number of impressive century farms across southwestern Ontario. And some of them, such as Meadowlea Farms Inc.in Brigden (St. Clair Township), are hard at work producing ecosystem services, such as cleaner water, cleaner air and more biodiversity, in addition to their traditional crops.

Meadowlea Farms has been in ALUS Lambton participants Scott and Susan Stephens’ family for 120 years. The land consists of 800 acres of fields growing cash crops such as corn, soybean, wheat, a 100-acre woodlot, 10 acres of pasture, and a little more than 25 acres of ALUS projects.

“The land we used for one of our ALUS projects was always hard to farm,” recalls Scott. “It was constantly flooding, the harvests were hit or miss, and it was risky pulling wagons up that steep hill. So we thought, why not just return those 16 acres back to nature? And that’s just what we did, thanks to ALUS Lambton.”

Signing up as participants in 2016, the Stephens now have eight ALUS projects established on environmentally sensitive parcels of land, including riparian and flood plain areas.

They have enhanced and created some wetlands and restored the buffer strips around them. They have also planted trees and shrubs to create wooded upland habitats, and planted Ontario native tallgrass prairie species to increase the grassland habitat on their land.

“Some of our fields have telephone poles in them, which are hard to farm around. We turned that area into a strip of native tallgrass prairie, to act as a buffer zone between the field and the ditch. It filters the water running off the fields to capture phosphorus, and serves as a wildlife corridor with food for pollinators and great cover for ground-nesting birds,” says Susan.

By next year, this ALUS project will be a thick strip of native tallgrass prairie growing more than seven feet tall. It will act as a buffer zone between the field and the ditch, capturing phosphorus and filtering the water running off the fields, and will serve as a wildlife corridor with food for pollinators and great cover for ground-nesting birds.
By next year, this ALUS project will be a thick strip of native tallgrass prairie growing more than seven feet tall. It will act as a buffer zone between the field and the ditch, capturing phosphorus and filtering the water running off the fields, and will serve as a wildlife corridor with food for pollinators and great cover for ground-nesting birds.

“On some of our other ALUS projects, we have trees growing in there now, we see more wildlife, more butterflies, and we have nice opportunities for outdoor activities with our family–we’ve gone canoeing up there, and skating and snowmobiling in the winter,” Susan continues.

All the Stephens’ ALUS projects are helping the environment in many ways. Their tallgrass prairie projects protect soil health while creating beneficial pollinator habitat, for instance.

Meanwhile, their wetland and riparian projects help improve fish habitat, water quality and quantity in the adjacent Black Creek, a major tributary to the Sydenham River, which is home to numerous species-at-risk.

In this way, the ALUS projects also help reduce phosphorus loads in the Sydenham River watershed, to contribute to a healthier ecosystem in the Great Lakes region for future generations.

As ALUS participants, the Stephens’ have seen first-hand the positive impacts ALUS projects can have on the landscape—now, they have started telling others about it. “Our ALUS projects are generating some interest from the neighbors,” he says. “We are happy to answer any questions, especially knowing that’s exactly how ALUS spreads on the ground: it’s a good idea that gets passed along from farmer to farmer.”

“Scott and Susan have always had a passion for the outdoors and for wildlife,” says ALUS Lambton Program Coordinator Lindsay Buchanan, recalling how their property was selected by the Ministry of Natural Resources many years ago as a good site to release wild turkeys as part of efforts to reintroduce the native bird to this region.

What’s more, says Buchanan “I think the Stephens are a great example of the motto I have adopted: ‘If you are going to live here, than live like you are going to stay here!’ This is something I heard University of Trent Professor Dan Longboat say, at a Carolinian Canada conference some time ago. It really struck a chord with me, and I try to promote it through my work with ALUS and Ontario NativeScape.”

ALUS Lambton participants Scott and Susan Stephens produce 25 acres of ecosystem services (cleaner air, cleaner water and more biodiversity) in Brigden, Ontario.
ALUS Lambton participants Scott and Susan Stephens produce 25 acres of ecosystem services (cleaner air, cleaner water and more biodiversity) in Brigden, Ontario.

View short video on ALUS Canada’s YouTube channel.


The Next Generation of Conservation in the West

Calgary business leaders celebrate strong support for ALUS Canada in Alberta, where ranchers produce cleaner air, cleaner water and wildlife habitat for all.

Calgary event Nov 2018
ALUS Canada’s Board Director Larry Kaumeyer (centre) and long-time supporter David Bissett co-hosted a special event at Calgary’s storied Ranchmen’s Club on November 28, 2018, to celebrate ALUS’ strong presence in Alberta. From L to R: Trish Nixon (Corporate Affairs, United Farmers of Alberta Cooperative); (back) Kim Sturgess (CEO & Founder, Alberta WaterSmart); event co-host Larry Kaumeyer (ALUS Canada Board Director and CEO, Buffalo Inspection Services); Greg Shyba (CEO, Ann & Sandy Cross Conservation Area and Chair, Calgary Foundation Environment Committee).

On November 28, a group of 20 Albertan business leaders joined ALUS Canada supporters and senior staff to celebrate ALUS’ strong presence in Alberta.

The event, at Calgary’s storied Ranchmen’s Club, was co-hosted by ALUS Canada’s Board Director, Larry Kaumeyer (CEO, Buffalo Inspection Services), and long-term ALUS supporter David Bissett.

In his opening remarks, Kaumeyer introduced ALUS Canada, A Weston Family Initiative, as a national charitable organization whose program supports farmers and ranchers who produce cleaner air, cleaner water, more biodiversity and other ecosystem services in their communities.

He thanked his co-host, David Bissett, who recently renewed his longstanding support for ALUS by creating the Bissett Action Fund in 2017.

“The Bissett Action Fund has already helped 45 farmers and ranchers redeploy nearly 1,000 acres of marginal land,” said Kaumeyer. “This land is now producing valuable ecosystem services that benefit all Albertans.”

Calgary event
The expansion of the ALUS program in Alberta is a testament of the success of its science-based, voluntary approach and, as ALUS’ western team can attest, there has been strong growth in demand from municipalities. From L to R: Bryan Gilvesy (CEO, ALUS Canada); Al Kemmere (President, Rural Municipalities of Alberta); Brian Rodgers (ALUS Mountain View PAC member); (back) Christine Campbell (Western Hub Manager, ALUS Canada); Sean La Brie (ALUS Mountain View PAC member).

ALUS Canada’s CEO, Bryan Gilvesy, described ALUS Canada’s scope across the nation, mentioning that the program has grown to 22 ALUS communities in six provinces, with nearly 600 participants. ALUS has enjoyed particular success in Alberta, home to 9,000 acres of ALUS projects, which represents roughly half of the program’s national total.

“So far, we’ve disbursed more than $1.6 million in funding to Alberta’s 10 ALUS communities, including nearly $675,000 last year alone,” he said, “and our investment is multiplied on the ground by strong municipal partners, participating farmers and ranchers, and local community sponsors.”

As ALUS’ western team can attest, there has been strong growth in demand from municipalities; the expansion of the ALUS program in Alberta is a testament of the success of its science-based, voluntary approach.

“The results in Alberta show that we can achieve landscape-scale improvements by engaging with the farm communities,” said Gilvesy. “There is very strong community support for ALUS here and that the potential for expansion is huge.”

“We see a great deal of enthusiasm in Alberta. We recognize that there is very strong community support for ALUS here and that the potential for expansion is huge,” said ALUS Canada CEO Bryan Gilvesy, pictured here with longstanding ALUS supporter David Bissett, whose Bissett Action Fund for Southern Alberta has already helped 45 farmers and ranchers redeploy nearly 1,000 acres of marginal land to the production of #ecosystem services that benefit all Albertans.
“We see a great deal of enthusiasm in Alberta. We recognize that there is very strong community support for ALUS here and that the potential for expansion is huge,” said ALUS Canada CEO Bryan Gilvesy, pictured here with longstanding ALUS supporter and event co-host David Bissett, whose Bissett Action Fund has already helped 45 farmers and ranchers redeploy nearly 1,000 acres of marginal land to the production of #ecosystem services that benefit all Albertans.

With sufficient financial support, ALUS Canada could add at least seven new communities in the province over the next three years, while also expanding Alberta’s existing ALUS communities to meet all the available demand. “There are ALUS projects waiting in the wings for funding,” Gilvesy said. “These include wetland restorations, buffer zones around watercourses, wildlife and pollinator habitats and projects that help build more resilient communities.”

The ALUS program is supported through a blend of philanthropic funding and government grants, with a new foray into corporate sponsorships. Katherine Balpataky, who recently joined ALUS as the Director of Corporate Partnerships and Business Development, works with business leaders to cultivate high-impact partnerships through this program, New Acre™ Project.

“I see ALUS, and the New Acre™ Project, as leading the development of a new ecosystem services market in Canada,” said Balpataky. “It’s the first of its kind in Canada, a ground-breaking program that empowers caring Canadian corporations to make a difference on the ground as part of their CSR commitments.”

Balpataky, along with all of ALUS Canada’s team, senior leadership and long-time supporters, are eager to develop new partnerships and help the ALUS program grow in Alberta, so that more farmers and ranchers can produce cleaner air, cleaner water and more wildlife habitat in their communities.

For more information on New Acre™ Project, please contact kbalpataky [@] alus.ca or visit ALUS.ca.

Putting ALUS on the map in Alberta! The ALUS program is supported through a blend of philanthropic funding and government grants, with a new foray into corporate sponsorships. With the New Acre™ Project. ALUS Canada is eager to develop new partnerships and help the ALUS program grow in Alberta, so that more farmers and ranchers can produce cleaner air, cleaner water and more wildlife habitat in their communities.
Putting ALUS on the map in Alberta! The ALUS program is supported through a blend of philanthropic funding and government grants, with a new foray into corporate sponsorships. With the New Acre™ Project. ALUS Canada is eager to develop new partnerships and help the ALUS program grow in Alberta, so that more farmers and ranchers can produce cleaner air, cleaner water and more wildlife habitat in their communities.

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